woman collaborating with work at home team via video chat during COVID 19 pandemic

The global COVID-19 pandemic changed the way that people work around the world. To help flatten the transmission curve, office buildings and other workplaces closed their doors while workers headed home to do their jobs—or co-work from home.

At the same time, students are trying to learn from home, extended families have moved into households, and there are countless new routines, workspaces and distractions to deal with.

COVID-19 means everyone has to manage transitions, changes and challenges—and fast. The move to co-working from home does not have to be a distressing situation, however. Working from home can boost morale and job satisfaction if you arrange things for your lifestyle.

With these tips, you should be able to get a handle on your transition to co-working from home, keeping your time productive and successful.

 


Managing Time Effectively

computer showing calendar showing productivity during COVID 19 pandemic quarantine

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Author: Rawpixel.com.

 

Co-working brings your office life to your household. This means time management is all the more important without the usual structure of your workplace.

  • Create a routine. While you won’t be getting up to start your commute at the usual time and scheduling meetings with co-workers in conference rooms, co-working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic is still best done with a routine in place.

    Check in with others in your home about their scheduling needs and block off the times to be at your workspace. Make sure each day and week has enough time scheduled for projects, deadlines and last-minute changes.

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  • Plan for interruptions. During the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s understandable that you may need to work off hours occasionally. That is especially true if your routine is interrupted with caregiving, sharing technology or other household situations. Yet, with entire teams co-working from home, it’s important to keep in touch with your employer, co-workers and be as available as possible.

    If you have to change your routine, let your colleagues know right away. The sooner everyone knows your needs, the more flexible they may be.

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  • Organize check-ins. In the typical office environment, you likely have scheduled check-ins with colleagues and managers, as well as impromptu conversations and connections that help keep everyone on track. When co-working from home, those check-ins require a more committed approach. At home, You cannot pop into a co-worker’s office or run into your manager in the break room.

    As you create your routine, make sure that check-ins are on the calendar. These check-ins encourage accountability and afford the opportunity to plan, troubleshoot and man-age the workload proactively.

 


Find the Positives and Address the Shortcomings

man waving at computer screen when collaborating with colleagues via video chat

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Author: Girts Ragelis.

 

Co-working from home, especially during COVID-19, requires patience and persistence. You may be scrambling do it with little notice. Even for those used to remote work, this pandemic comes with challenges and a steep learning curve for technology, interaction with colleagues and balancing work and life.

With a little practice, you can get through the hiccups and do your best, knowing that things may not work perfectly right away. Coordinating with housemates and teammates, you can get through the shortcomings to find solutions that fit your work, family and lifestyle.

 

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